Jadu

Jadu at Wales Millennium Centre Cardiff Aug10Jadu create music that explores new musical frontiers and rejoices in the richness of diversity and the power of tradition. Their music expresses  the synthesis of cultures which is one of the signatures of the 21st Century. Jadu means magic in Hindi, and the magic is crafted by the talented hands of five extraordinary musicians: Pete Stacey, soprano sax and flute, Rajesh David, vocals and harmonium, Kelly Smith, tabla, Paul Uden, guitar and Bryan Smith, tamboura.

 

Nourished by the landscape and silence of west Wales, their music is inspired by the restless waves of the Irish sea, the ancient cliffs of Cardigan Bay and the mists swirling in the valleys of the Cambrian mountains. Each of them brings something different to the creative melting pot that forms the music of Jadu. Pete's musical soul is steeped in jazz, he makes the sax and flute sing so lyrically,  a native of Swansea, he has studied classical Indian music and composed for both NIshat Khan and Hariprasad Chaurasia and he plays regularly with India Dance Wales. Rajesh's heart is so full of devotion that it spills over into his voice and takes the listener on an unforgettable journey. Born in Mumbai, taught classical Indian music by his gifted parents, Rajesh has studied the power of sound and mantra and taken it to a new level. Kelly, born and bred in west Wales, has a passion for tabla and a power to his performance that creates dynamic, exciting music. Kelly is also a member of Tarang, the UK's National Indian Music Ensemble. Pauls's guitar shimmers, sparkles like light on water, creating a river of sound. His multiple influences range from funk to jazz, mento to son and he has built a style that is unique. Bryan brings the richness of his musical journey of fifty years, spanning rock, folk and R & B. He's an innovative singer/songwriter and has played Indian devotional music since the earliy eighties.

  So their music is a creative synthesis of classical Indian music and Jazz. They explore the musical frontiers of the country created by Coltrane, Mclaughlin and Ravi Shankar, the pioneers of Indo-Jazz.

Phil Scarff, describing the blending of jazz and Indian classical music says:

'Both musics are deep and expressive, and are based on improvisation. Both employ improvisation that can derive from an underlying composition. Concepts from both idioms can increase the musical vocabulary of the musician and the composer, and can be used as resources for improvisation and composition.'                           (orientalblues.com)

This perfectly describes the process of composition that results in the music of Jadu. One person will arrive with a theme, a concept, such as Rajeshs's experience watching the sun set into the Irish sea that resulted in Aberaeron Sunset, or Paul's experience sailing accross a river in Morocco that lead to Boragrag. Then they will play with it, each band member adding their own flavour to the piece until the whole becomes a rich banquet of sound and colour, giving the listener an experience that is both moving and transcendent.

Aberaeron Sunset by Jadu UK